Nelson Pouring the Concrete Floor in the New Milking Parlor

PHOTOGRAPH INFO

The nearby Thaler dairy farm (where Jakey works) has been in the process of installing a new "milking parlor" for the last six months. I've been photographically documenting the process and hope to share the entire results at some point, in some fashion.

A milking parlor is a special type of building outfitted with specific equipment that makes the milking process easier and much more efficient. It's run by computers.

The company who built the parlor is a Mennonite contracting company, which explains the hats and clothing on the men on the right. Some Mennonite people object to having their photos taken so I asked permission before I started shooting the project. I was told that if the men were working rather than posing, it was ok to photograph them.

In this photo the three men are standing on an elevated area where the cows will be milked.

Camera settings and post-processing: Shot with the Canon EOS 5D and the Canon EF 24-70mm f/2.8L lens at 24mm, ISO 1600, f/3.5, 1/125s. Curves adjustments, color balancing, perspective correction.

Thanks for visiting Durham Township!

--Kathleen

Comments

Three legged stool and pail are things of the past
When milking the herd it helps to be fast.
Overheard was one workers solemn lament...
"Only three of us here to pour all this cement."
So trowel and finish before it is cast
The new milking parlor will soon be here at last.

Posted by JPH on April 9, 2008 6:48 AM

yeah nice!
i can see a nice series just buy reading your caption... it be good if you did take photos early into the process and somehow your images show the progress.... cant wait to see them....

Posted by aminTorres on April 9, 2008 9:21 AM

Very nice. Actually, they are pouring a concrete floor. Cement is just one component of concrete. This brings back memories of helping my dad in the summers in high school. He was a bricklayer and I used to mix the "mud" and haul brick up the scaffold for him.

Posted by Russ on April 9, 2008 9:55 AM

Love the hats! They look like handsome models. (But that's probably disrespectful--sorry.)

Posted by RD on April 9, 2008 10:49 AM

GOT MUD? As per RD, with all the action going on, the scene is totally dominated by the finishers' hats--cool, and apparently not available for use by mud-barrow pilots.

Leaves me wondering what's the price tag for today's milking parlor?

Posted by david tinnon on April 9, 2008 11:44 AM

Great photo. The placement of the workers between the windows, the three windows and other parallel lines, the lighting all work to make a strong photo. The hats and shirts add that extra touch!
I look forward to seeing the whole series of photos documenting the building of the milking parlor!

Posted by Anita Bower on April 10, 2008 9:04 AM

Love the natural light and feel to this image. Nice Kathleen, very nice.

Posted by Craig Wilson on April 10, 2008 2:59 PM

Russ: Thanks for the correction! I fixed the title. I appreciate knowing the technical details.

David Tinnon: About $250,000!

Posted by Kathleen on April 10, 2008 10:23 PM

Just a point - In my Webster's Encyclopedic Unabridged Dictionary of the English Language - Definition 7 for cement is..... to coat or cover with cement: to cement a floor. So I think either discription would be correct.

Posted by JPH on April 11, 2008 7:23 AM

Wonderful job of documenting the process. The building looks so bright. It seems like there will be a pleasant atmosphere for the task of milking.

Posted by Laurie on April 11, 2008 1:24 PM

JPH, OK for that Webster, but once upon a time, this Webster picked up a sack of cement to set a fence post....thats the last time I confused to two.....

Posted by david tinnon on April 11, 2008 3:32 PM

i really like the feeling of their concentration here and I also love the the light and strong lines and simple textures in this photo. :)

Posted by kayt on April 11, 2008 8:58 PM
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